Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017

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Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017
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The Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017 is a limited edition wine sourced from a single estate DOCG vineyard in the Valdobbiadene area of the Prosecco growing region the Veneto district of northern Italy. This Bubbly commentates the 70th year of Bortolomiol, though the winery goes back more than 200 years in one form or another.

Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017

With the 2021 Holiday season ramping up, we at CWF decided to showcase Bubbly/Sparkling wine that was a little out of the mainstream. Bubbly was delicious and unique, but not too expensive. When folks decide to spend serious money on Bubbly, they always choose Champagne, which leaves an entire universe of under-valued Bubbly.

Everyone knows Prosecco is the #1 selling Sparkling wine globally in terms of volume, the Champagne region takes in more money, but Prosecco sells more gallons or Bubbly. You can find excellent Prosecco in supermarkets, store brands, and all types of retail wine shops. It is typically excellent, well-priced, and delivers what Prosecco drinkers want.

This is where the Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017 differs. Two-thirds of all Prosecco is made as a demi-sec (slightly sweet) wine, while Brut Nature, meaning no added sugar and the dryest Sparkling wine designation.

Most Prosecco is non-vintage, meaning that the winery blends several vintages of juice to achieve a “House Style” that is identifiable and can be replicated year after year. The Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017 is made only from grapes picked at the harvest in 2017.

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While non-vintage Prosecco is intentionally produced to mimic previous years, vintage-dated Prosecco is allowed to showcase what occurred in the vineyards in 2017. Vintage Prosecco should be very different from non-vintage Prosecco; it should have a unique personality.

The grapes are taken from particular parts of the vineyard set aside for this wine. The difference between bone dry Bubbly and the typically slightly sweet Bubbly should make the Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017 a very different drinking experience. The alcohol content is 12%.

The Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017 Tasting Notes

The color is silver with a hint of gold; there are plenty of fine energetic bubbles. The nose mixes yeasty bread and ripe citrus, tart apple, and a floral background. The Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017 has some weight to the flavors, melons, lemons, and exotic fruit and citrus.

This Bubbly tastes like Meyer lemon, juicy apple, melon, dried pear, banana, grapefruit, and mild candy spice. The mid-palate adds a salty/nutty sensation, a hint of cream, stone fruit, and coconut milk. The acidity is well-balanced and does not bite. With most non-vintage Prosecco, a good edge is needed to balance the high sugar content, which is not required here.

The Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017 made a 2nd fermentation that lasted three months which is long for a Bubbly made with the Charmat Method, making this Bubbly smooth with well-integrated flavors.

The Summary

  • The Bortolomiol 70th Anniversary DOCG Brut Nature Prosecco 2017 is a small production Bubbly only 8,000 bottles produced. It is probably hard to find, but excellent vintage Prosecco should be available at any good retail wine shop.
  • While regular non-vintage Prosecco is the most populat Bubbly around, going upscale and experience the best of the vineyards and the winemakers skills is a worthwhile experience.
  • Vintage Prosecco should cost between $15 and $30 and you are getting a unique top-notch Bubbly for a bargain price.
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