Snap Dragon Cabernet Sauvignon 2011

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Snap Dragon Cabernet Sauvignon 2011
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The 2011 Snap Dragon Cabernet Sauvignon is 91% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6% Petite Sirah and 3% Merlot sourced from multiple vineyards in the 81% Lodi AVA (the bottle front label lists California for the grape origin, but since 75% of the grapes came from Lodi, the bottle could have legally shown Lodi) and 19% from the Central Coast AVA in California. Snap Dragon is one of Diageo Wines 39+ wine brands, they also have extensive vineyard holdings in California. This Cabernet is aged in oak barrels for 12 months (pretty good for a sub ten-dollar wine) with 50% French oak and 50% American oak. Even though it has oak aging, they recommend drinking this Cab by 2015. The alcohol content is 13.5%. The color is a dark, almost opaque black cherry red with crimson highlights. The nose is pretty good, ripe dark fruit with oak spice, mocha coffee and a little French vanilla. This is soft, rounded, fruit forward Cabernet Sauvignon, with some welcome structure and spice on the mid palate. It tastes of blackberry, caramel, ripe plum and creamy vanilla. The mid palate adds a slightly rough brush from the tannins (nothing too out-of-place) and exotic spices with a final splash of cherry. The acidity is slightly muted and the finish is full and long. The 2011 Snap Dragon Cabernet Sauvignon is a pretty decent every day Cab, when you consider that is can sell for a low as $6 and can be found fairly routinely for $8, it is really semi remarkable. It won’t make you forget top-flight Cabs from some of the prime Cabernet Sauvignon growing regions, but at well under 10 bucks it holds up nicely. This is a sipping on the back porch or a paired with comfort foods kind of wine and I think it would really do well with your best meatloaf with mashed potatoes and gravy efforts.

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